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Posts for tag: crowns

By THOMAS KEMLAGE DDS / ANDREW T. KEMLAGE DDS
August 28, 2018
Category: Cosmetic Dentistry

Cosmetic Dentistry Repairs Your SmileAt Kemlage Family Dentistry in Fenton, MO, Dr. Thomas Kemlage and Dr. Andrew Kemlage offer the finest in cosmetic dentistry services. Supplying whatever you need to remake your less than perfect smile, this professional team loves to see patients happy with their aesthetic makeovers. After all, looking your very best is a personal asset that helps you both socially and professionally.

The keys to excellent cosmetic dentistry

There are really two: a realistic, detailed treatment plan and excellent artistic skill. You can find both at Kemlage Family Dentistry in Fenton as cosmetic smile makeovers change smiles and lives, too.

A realistic, detailed treatment plan begins with a complete oral examination by Dr. Kemlage. He'll make sure your teeth are healthy and your gums, pink and intact. He'll look at your dental bite and jaw joint function and discover any signs of excessive wear or dark tooth color.

Additionally, your Fenton cosmetic dentist will ask you how you wish to enhance your teeth and gums. Do you dislike some obvious dental stains from coffee, tobacco or the aging process? Or, are those fine cracks on some lower front teeth becoming more and more obvious? Together, you and your dentist will decide what kind of treatment would suit you best, and in the end, you'll love the results.

Featured cosmetic treatments

Professional teeth whitening is a popular cosmetic treatment. This in-office or at-home service lifts yellow, brown, and just plain unattractive stains from tooth surfaces, leaving smiles shiny and several shades brighter with little to no residual sensitivity.

Another simple, but effective, service is composite resin bonding. This one-visit treatment adds a tooth-colored mixture of glass and acrylic to flaws such as cracks, small gaps, and pits, creating a strong and natural-looking repair which lasts for years. This is the same material Dr. Kemlage uses in white fillings.

Often, bonding pairs with enamel contouring. This is a painless reshaping of uneven enamel.

For more substantial defects, Dr. Kemlage may suggest porcelain veneers, or dental laminates. These thin porcelain shells disguise damage from injury, stains, and more.

Finally, Dr. Kemlage features dental implants, bridgework, CEREC same-day crowns, inlays and onlays, and specialty dentures to combine the best in restoration and tooth replacement with excellent aesthetics. In other words, whatever you need to create a great looking and functioning smile, the team at Kemlage Family Dentistry can provide it on site in a caring, patient-centered manner.

What's your need?

Talk it over with Dr. Thomas Kemlage and Dr. Andrew Kemlage at Kemlage Family Dentistry. You'll love their amazing ideas, listening ears and comfortable treatments that focus on your best possible smile. Call today for a cosmetic dentistry consultation in Fenton, MO: (636) 225-1777.

By Thomas Kemlage DDS / Andrew T. Kemlage DDS
June 15, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
AToothlessTiger

Let’s say you’re traveling to Italy to surprise your girlfriend, who is competing in an alpine ski race… and when you lower the scarf that’s covering your face, you reveal to the assembled paparazzi that one of your front teeth is missing. What will you do about this dental dilemma?

Sound far-fetched? It recently happened to one of the most recognized figures in sports — Tiger Woods. There’s still some uncertainty about exactly how this tooth was taken out: Was it a collision with a cameraman, as Woods’ agent reported… or did Woods already have some problems with the tooth, as others have speculated? We still don’t know for sure, but the big question is: What happens next?

Fortunately, contemporary dentistry offers several good solutions for the problem of missing teeth. Which one is best? It depends on each individual’s particular situation.

Let’s say that the visible part of the tooth (the crown) has been damaged by a dental trauma (such as a collision or a blow to the face), but the tooth still has healthy roots. In this case, it’s often possible to keep the roots and replace the tooth above the gum line with a crown restoration (also called a cap). Crowns are generally made to order in a dental lab, and are placed on a prepared tooth in a procedure that requires two office visits: one to prepare the tooth for restoration and to make a model of the mouth and the second to place the custom-manufactured crown and complete the restoration. However, in some cases, crowns can be made on special machinery right in the dental office, and placed during the same visit.

But what happens if the root isn’t viable — for example, if the tooth is deeply fractured, or completely knocked out and unable to be successfully re-implanted?

In that case, a dental implant is probably the best option for tooth replacement. An implant consists of a screw-like post of titanium metal that is inserted into the jawbone during a minor surgical procedure. Titanium has a unique property: It can fuse with living bone tissue, allowing it to act as a secure anchor for the replacement tooth system. The crown of the implant is similar to the one mentioned above, except that it’s made to attach to the titanium implant instead of the natural tooth.

Dental implants look, function and “feel” just like natural teeth — and with proper care, they can last a lifetime. Although they may be initially expensive, their quality and longevity makes them a good value over the long term. A less-costly alternative is traditional bridgework — but this method requires some dental work on the adjacent, healthy teeth; plus, it isn’t expected to last as long as an implant, and it may make the teeth more prone to problems down the road.

What will the acclaimed golfer do? No doubt Tiger’s dentist will help him make the right tooth-replacement decision.

If you have a gap in your grin — whatever the cause — contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation, and find out which tooth-replacement system is right for you. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Dental Implant Surgery” and “Crowns & Bridgework.”

By Thomas Kemlage DDS / Andrew T. Kemlage DDS
March 09, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: crowns   veneers  
Life-likeDentalPorcelainHelpsRestoreSmilesMarredbyUnattractiveTeeth

With its life-like color and texture, dental porcelain can restore a smile marred by decayed or damaged teeth. This durable ceramic material not only matches the varieties of individual tooth colors and hues, its translucence mimics the appearance of natural teeth. But perhaps its greatest benefit is its adaptability for use in a number of different applications, particularly veneers and crowns.

Veneers are thin layers of dental porcelain laminated together and permanently bonded to cover the visible outer side of a tooth to improve its appearance. Crowns, on the other hand, are “caps” of dental porcelain designed to completely cover a defective tooth.

Veneers and crowns share a number of similarities. Both can alter the color and shape of teeth, although crowns are used when more extensive tooth structure has been damaged. They’re also “irreversible,” meaning the tooth must be altered in such a way that it will always require a veneer or crown, though on some occasions a veneer can require no removal of tooth structure and can be reversible.

They do, however, have some differences as to the type of situation they address. Veneers are generally used where the affected teeth have a poor appearance (chipped, malformed or stained, for example) but are still structurally healthy. And although they do generally require some removal of tooth enamel to accommodate them (to minimize a “bulky” appearance), the reduction is much less than for a crown.

Crowns, on the other hand, restore teeth that have lost significant structure from disease, injury, stress-related grinding habits or the wearing effects of aging. Since they must contain enough mass to stand up to the normal biting forces a tooth must endure, a significant amount of the original tooth structure must be removed to accommodate them.

Which application we use will depend upon a thorough examination of your teeth. Once we’ve determined their condition and what you need, we can then recommend the best application for your situation. But regardless of whether we install a veneer or crown, using dental porcelain can help achieve an end result that’s truly life-changing — a new, younger-looking smile.

If you would like more information on dental porcelain restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Porcelain Crowns & Veneers.”

By Thomas Kemlage DDS
July 17, 2012
Category: Dental Procedures
DentalCrownFAQs

Dental crowns are excellent tools that we use to restore functionality, color and/or beauty to teeth and your smile. And while many people may have heard of them, often times there are many questions surrounding the process, costs and their maintenance. This is why we have put together this list of some of the questions we are commonly asked on this subject. Our goal is to provide you with straightforward answers so that you have a clearer understanding of the treatment and are comfortable making the decision to go forward with these excellent tooth restorations should they ever be required.

What Is A Crown?

A dental crown is a tooth-shaped “cap” or cover that a dentist places over a tooth that is badly damaged from trauma or decay in order to restore its color, strength, size and functionality. They are also used for cosmetic reasons to improve discolored or misshapen teeth.

Why Can The Cost Of Crowns Vary?

The reason the cost of a crown can vary greatly, even from dentist to dentist is quite simple. The most beautiful crowns require the artistry and years of experience of a team of dental professionals; your dentist and the laboratory technicians that handcraft crowns. To meet higher expectations of some individuals requires more experience, artistry and skill. And great art just tends to cost more. A customized temporary crown may even be used as a preview to see what a final crown will look like. Another critical factor is the choice of materials used. For example, while all porcelain crowns are made from high-quality ceramic (glass) material, they are not equal. It is therefore more expensive in terms of time, skill and expertise to produce the most natural looking results.

How Long Will A Crown Last?

Most dentists expect a crown to last at least 7-10 years with normal wear and proper maintenance. However, depending on the materials used and location of the tooth, they can last upwards of 50 years or more. For example, a gold crown has the longest lifespan because gold is such a durable material that has little to no negative impact on surrounding teeth. On the other hand, porcelain produces a completely natural look but can cause wear to adjacent teeth.

What Materials Are Most Often Used For Crowns?

The three most common materials used to make crowns are as follows:

  • Gold
  • Porcelain-Fused-to Metal (PFM)
  • All porcelain

To learn more on this topic, read the Dear Doctor article, “Porcelain Crowns & Veneers.” You can also contact us to discuss your questions or to schedule a consultation.