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Posts for tag: root canal

By THOMAS KEMLAGE DDS / ANDREW T. KEMLAGE DDS
November 07, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root canal  

How a root canal from your dentists in Fenton, MO, can eliminate your tooth pain

Have you been struggling with a nagging toothache? You may be dealing with tooth decay, a harmful condition that can cause profoundly Root_Canalnegative consequences to your oral and general health. Fortunately, here at Kemlage Family Dentistry in Fenton, MO, your dentists, Drs. Thomas and Andrew Kemlage, can use root canal treatment to fix your tooth decay issue. Read on to learn more.

 

Do you need root canal treatment?

Root canal treatment becomes necessary when the innermost layer of your tooth, an area known as the pulp, becomes damaged, bruised, or infected. The pulp is where the blood supply and nerves to the tooth are located. When this area becomes damaged, inflammation occurs, and fluid builds up inside your tooth, in turn, causing pressure and pain to permeate throughout the structure.

Severe tooth pain is often the first sign that you might need a root canal. Some common signs and symptoms you may need a root canal include:

  • Recurrent throbbing pain that doesn’t resolve
  • Increasing pain when you consume foods/beverages that are hot, cold, or sugary
  • Pain that radiates to your face, jaws, or head
  • A white or red bump on your gums next to a tooth root
  • Blood or pus draining from the bump on your gums

You may experience these signs or symptoms and need a root canal due to:

  • Severe decay which has spread to the pulp of your tooth
  • Dental trauma due to an accident or injury
  • Dental trauma due to excessive clenching or grinding at night
  • Repeated trauma to a tooth for any reason

The first step in determining if you need a root canal is to visit your dentist for diagnostic testing. Diagnostic tools that are commonly used include dental x-rays, temperature testing, and vitality testing.

Once your dentist has determined that you need a root canal, your dentist will remove the diseased pulp tissue that is lying inside your tooth. A sedative material is then placed inside the tooth to eliminate inflammation. After the inflammation is gone, the sedative material is removed and replaced with an inert material, thus giving you a newly healthy tooth!

 

Contact Us

To learn more about root canal treatment and how it can help you, call Kemlage Family Dentistry in Fenton, MO, today. Dial (636) 225-1777 now to get rid of your dental pain!

By THOMAS KEMLAGE DDS / ANDREW T. KEMLAGE DDS
September 25, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures

What your dentists in Fenton, Missouri want you to knowroot canal

If you have a tooth that hurts, it may be a sign that you need root canal treatment. A root canal, also called an endodontic procedure, is a great way to eliminate dental pain but still enable you to keep your tooth. Dr. Thomas Kemlage and Dr. Andrew Kemlage at Kemlage Family Dentistry in Fenton, Missouri want to share what you need to know about root canal treatment.

These are just a few of the reasons why you should try to keep your tooth:

  • Going without the tooth can cause you to lose bone support
  • Going without the tooth can cause biting and chewing problems

So how do you know if you need a root canal? There are several signs and symptoms to look for including:

  • Drainage or pus near the root of a tooth
  • Swelling and redness around a tooth
  • Throbbing pain that doesn’t resolve
  • Sharp pain when you eat hot or cold foods
  • Pain that radiates into your face or jaws

If you notice these signs or symptoms, you should seek out your dentists in Fenton, Missouri. They will perform temperature and vitality tests and take digital x-rays to determine if your tooth shows evidence of needing a root canal.

If you do need a root canal, your dentists will begin by opening a small hole in the top of your affected tooth. The infected and diseased tissue is drawn out through the opening and a calming, sedative material is placed inside the tooth. After a healing period and the pain and pressure are gone, the sedative is removed and replaced with a permanent inert material. As a final step, the hole is filled in with a small restoration or a dental crown is placed to protect the tooth.

Root canal treatment is the solution to eliminating dental pain without sacrificing your tooth. For more information about root canal treatment and other dental services, call Dr. Thomas Kemlage and Dr. Andrew Kemlage at Kemlage Family Dentistry in Fenton, Missouri today!

By Thomas Kemlage DDS / Andrew T. Kemlage DDS
February 27, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
KellyClarksonGetstotheRootoftheProblem

Now that celebrities can communicate directly with their fans through social media, we’ve started to see dispatches from some surprising locations — the dental chair, for example! Take singer Kelly Clarkson, who was the first winner of American Idol, and perhaps one of the first to seek moral support via social media before having an emergency root canal procedure.

“Emergency root canal — I’ve had better days,” Kelly posted on her Facebook page, along with a photo of herself looking… well, pretty nervous. But is a root canal procedure really something to be scared about? It’s time to clear up some misconceptions about this very common dental procedure.

First of all, root canal treatment is done to save a tooth that might otherwise be lost to an infection deep inside it. So while it’s often looked upon with apprehension, it’s a very positive step to take if you want to keep your teeth as long as possible. Secondly, tooth infections can be painful — but it’s the root canal procedure that stops the pain. What, actually, is done during this tooth-saving treatment?

First, a local anesthetic is administered to keep you from feeling any pain. Then, a small opening is made through the chewing surface of the infected tooth, giving access to the central space inside, which is called the “pulp chamber.” A set of tiny instruments is used to remove the diseased pulp (nerve) tissue in the chamber, and to clean out the root canals: branching tunnel-like spaces that run from the pulp chamber through the root (or roots) of the tooth. The cleared canals are then filled and sealed.

At a later appointment, we will give you a more permanent filling or, more likely, a crown, to restore your tooth’s full function and protect it from further injury. A tooth that has had a root canal followed by a proper restoration can last as long as any other natural tooth — a very long time indeed.

If you have any questions about root canal treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “A Step by Step Guide to Root Canal Treatment.”

By Thomas Kemlage DDS
May 15, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: oral health   root canal  
FactsYouShouldKnowAboutRootCanalTreatment

If the words “root canal” frighten you, what you probably don't know is that “root canal treatment” doesn't cause pain, it alleviates it — by treating infection deep in the root of your tooth.

  • What is a root canal? The central chamber of a tooth contains the living vital tissues comprising the pulp including its nerves and blood vessels. The interior of the tooth's roots containing the pulp make up its root canals.
  • How do I know if a tooth has a root canal infection? Symptoms of root canal infection may include sharp, intense pain when you bite down, a dull ache or pressure, or tenderness and swelling in gums near an infected tooth. There may be lingering pain after eating cold or hot foods. However, sometimes an infected tooth may stop hurting and you no longer feel pain. This doesn't mean the infection has gone, only that the nerve may have died. Make an appointment if you suspect that you have any or some of these symptoms.
  • Why would a tooth need root canal treatment? If the tissues in the root canal/s become infected or inflamed because of deep decay or trauma to a tooth, root canal treatment is needed to treat the infection and save the tooth. If left untreated, root canal infection can spread into the bone immediately around the root.
  • What takes place in a root canal procedure? After a local anesthetic is administered to numb the tooth and surrounding area, a small opening is made in the biting surface for a back tooth, or behind a front tooth. Dead and/or dying tissue is removed from the pulp chamber and the root canals are cleaned, disinfected, and sealed to prevent future infection.
  • What can I expect afterwards? Your tooth may feel tender or sensitive for a few days. You can take over-the-counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication, aspirin or ibuprofen, for example, to relieve pain or discomfort. Contact us if you have pain that lasts more than a few days. A crown is usually needed to protect the tooth following root canal treatment. Further arrangements need to be made for this stage of the procedure. Don't chew on the affected tooth until symptoms subside and the tooth has been restored as necessary.
  • Who performs root canal treatment? While all general dentists have received training in endodontic treatment and can perform most endodontic procedures, in complicated situations you may be referred to an endodontist, a specialist in root canal diagnosis and treatment.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about root canal treatment. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Common Concerns About Root Canal Treatment.”

By Thomas Kemlage DDS
December 11, 2012
Category: Dental Procedures
CanYouWhitenTraumatizedTeeth

If you are pleased with your smile except for that one front tooth that appears darker, then we have good news for you. Often a tooth appears darker as a result of trauma that may have occurred years ago. Your tooth may need root canal treatment or may have already had root canal treatment in the past. Regardless, you can whiten this tooth via a process called internal bleaching. And as the name suggests, the tooth can be bleached from the inside out. Here's a brief summary of how this entire process works:

  1. Performing an x-ray exam: The first step is to take a radiograph (x-ray) to make sure that your root canal filling is intact adequately sealing the root canal and the surrounding bone is healthy.
  2. Making an access hole: To apply the bleaching agent, a small hole will need to be made in the back of your tooth to apply the bleach. However, before doing that, the area must be thoroughly cleaned and irrigated.
  3. Sealing above the root canal filling: This step is critical to prevent the bleach from leaking into the root canal space.
  4. Applying the bleach: To obtain the whitening needed, it typically requires between one and four office visits for additional bleaching.
  5. Applying a permanent restoration: Once your tooth has lightened to the desired color, a permanent filling will be placed over the small hole to seal your tooth's dentin. This is then covered with tooth-colored composite resin (filling material) so that the access hole is undetectable to the naked eye.

To learn more about this procedure and see amazing before and after images, continue reading the Dear Doctor article, “Whitening Traumatized Teeth.” Or, you can contact us to discuss your questions or to schedule an appointment.